donation
To request Mental Health
Services or to access Mental
Health Crisis Services Call:
1-800-375-4357

Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Is Your Smartphone or Tablet an Injury Risk?How Safe Is It to Fly?Variety is Key for the Fittest AmericansFor Tracking Steps, Patients Stick With Phones, Not Wearable Devices: StudySocial Media Stokes Myths About Vaccines5 Expert Tips for Preventing Winter Sports AccidentsMany Americans Lack Knowledge, Not Desire, to Eat Plant-Based Diets'Couch Potato' Lifestyle Poses Danger to Women's Hearts5 Secrets to an Allergy-Free Valentine's DayRestful Romance: Smelling Your Lover's Shirt Can Help You SleepHow Does Social Media Shape Your Food Choices?AHA News: How a Happy Relationship Can Help Your HealthTexting While Walking Is Risky BusinessShovel That Snow, but Spare Your BackSpring Time Change Tied to More Fatal Car CrashesHealth Tip: Healthy Ways to Deal With SadnessEating Out: A Recipe for Poor Nutrition, Study FindsHealthy Living Helps Keep the Flu at BayNew Clues Show How Stress May Turn Your Hair GrayHealth Tip: Warning Signs of Drowsy DrivingAHA News: Can Social Media Be Good for Your Health?Sunscreen Chemicals Absorbed Into Body, Study FindsCould a Switch to Skim Milk Add Years to Your Life?Many Americans Are Inactive, With Southerners Faring WorseWhy Tidying Up Is Sometimes Harder Than ExpectedProbiotics: Don't Buy the Online HypePot-Using Drivers Still Impaired After the High Fades'Burnout' Could Raise Your Odds for A-fibHealth Tip: Healthier Ways to Use Social MediaMany Americans Sleep More in WinterProcessed Foods Are Making Americans ObeseSo Long, 98.6: Average Human Body Temperature Is DroppingHow Does Missed Sleep Affect Your Appetite?New Year's Resolutions Didn't Stick? Try a Monday ResetHealth Tip: Is Worrying Out of Control?Tips to Keep New Year's ResolutionsAHA News: Get Started on the Path to Better Health in the New YearYoga May Bring a Brain Boost, Review ShowsSome Solid Advice on New Year's Resolutions That Might StickFestive Foods Can Leave Those on Restricted Diets Out in the ColdGet Ready for the Sleepiest Day of the YearYour TV, Smartphone Screens May Send Toxins Into Your HomeHealth Tip: Resolutions for a Healthier New YearDo Your Heart a Favor: Bike, Walk to WorkRegular Exercise Cuts Odds for 7 Major CancersHow to Stay Fit When You're Traveling for Work or FunDespite Danger, Tanning Beds Still a Fixture in Many GymsAHA News: Are You Drinking Enough During Winter Months?Unhealthy Eating Habits Cost U.S. $50 Billion a Year: StudyHeart Risks in Your Genes? Be Sure to Get Your Zzzs
LinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Smoking
Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management
Weight Loss

How Well Are You Aging? A Blood Test Might Tell

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Dec 5th 2019

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Dec. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Imagine a blood test that could spot whether you are aging too quickly.

New research suggests it's not the stuff of science fiction anymore.

The scientists analyzed plasma -- the cell-free, fluid part of blood -- from more than 4,200 people between the ages of 18 and 95, and found a link between 373 proteins and aging.

"We've known for a long time that measuring certain proteins in the blood can give you information about a person's health status -- lipoproteins for cardiovascular health, for example," said study senior author Tony Wyss-Coray. He's co-director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Stanford University in California.

"But it hasn't been appreciated that so many different proteins' levels -- roughly a third of all the ones we looked at -- change markedly with advancing age," he added in a university news release.

The study was published Dec. 5 in the journal Nature Medicine.

"Proteins are the workhorses of the body's constituent cells, and when their relative levels undergo substantial changes, it means you've changed, too," Wyss-Coray explained. "Looking at thousands of them in plasma gives you a snapshot of what's going on throughout the body."

The findings suggest that physical aging doesn't occur at a steady pace, but is uneven and has three distinct surges -- ages 34, 60 and 78.

At those ages, there are spikes in levels of specific proteins in the blood with noticeable changes, according to the researchers.

Eventually, a blood test for these proteins might be able to identify people who are aging more rapidly than normal and at increased risk for age-related conditions such as Alzheimer's disease or heart disease.

Such a test might also help identify drugs or other factors that slow or speed aging, the study authors said.

However, any clinical use of such a blood test is at least five to 10 years away, the researchers noted.

"Ideally, you'd want to know how virtually anything you took or did affects your physiological age," Wyss-Coray said.

More information

Healthfinder.gov offers tips on protecting your health as you age.