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5 Secrets to an Allergy-Free Valentine's Day

HealthDay News
by -- Kayla McKiski
Updated: Feb 14th 2020

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Feb. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Valentine's Day is a great opportunity to shower your loved one with gifts, but some may do more harm than good.

"If you want to impress your beloved this year, take a pass on gifts that cause sneezing and wheezing," said allergist Dr. J. Allen Meadows, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

"Once you have an understanding of your valentine's allergy and asthma triggers, you can search for gifts that express your love while keeping them healthy. That will make everyone's heart go pit-a-pat," he said in an ACAAI news release.

Here are five valentines the college suggests you avoid:

  • Sweets or snacks with mystery ingredients: Common food allergens are eggs, milk, nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, soy and sesame. Before you buy those chocolates or exotic pastries, be sure the ingredients are OK.
  • Romantic evenings by the fireplace: Smoke can trigger allergy symptoms for those with asthma. Try setting the romantic mood with LED candles.
  • Heavy perfume or cologne: An overpowering scent can send your lover into a symptomatic frenzy. Rethink a gift of perfume if your valentine doesn't wear scents -- it's probably for a reason.
  • Flowers that cause sneezing: Avoid bouquets with daisies, goldenrod, sunflowers and chamomile. Roses are a safe bet for anyone who is allergic to pollen.
  • Dust, mold and grime: Clean your home to get rid of allergens for the special night. (And here's a guide for the future: Change your air filters every three months, vacuum regularly and wash bedding weekly.)

More information

The Mayo Clinic has more about allergies.