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Another COVID Hazard: False Information

HealthDay News
by -- Steven Reinberg
Updated: Aug 11th 2020

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TUESDAY, Aug. 11, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Be careful that the COVID-19 information you're getting is accurate and not opinion masquerading as the real McCoy, says the American College of Emergency Physicians.

Watch out for bold claims and instant cures touted on social media or by friends. Get health and medical information from experts like the ACEP and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the physicians' group says.

"A troubling number of purported experts are sharing false and dangerous information that runs counter to the public health and safety guidelines endorsed by ACEP and the nation's leading medical and public health entities," said Dr. William Jaquis, president of the college.

"This kind of misinformation can not only be harmful to individuals, but it hinders our nation's efforts to get the pandemic under control," he added in a college news release.

You should know that there is no cure or vaccine for COVID-19. Scientists keep learning more about the virus and how to treat it. COVID-19 can be spread by anyone -- even people who don't think they're infected.

About 40% of those infected don't have symptoms, but can spread the virus. The virus isn't harmless, and its long-term effects are still being studied.

Without a cure, the best defense is making smart choices and safe behaviors, the college says.

"There are still many questions about COVID-19, but we know these three simple steps offer the best protection that we have until a vaccine is developed: cover your face, wash your hands frequently and practice social distancing," Jaquis said.

More information

For more on COVID-19, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.