donation
To request Mental Health
Services or to access Mental
Health Crisis Services Call:
1-800-375-4357

Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
AHA News: Your Next Doctor's Prescription Might Be to Spend Time in NatureAHA News: Carrying a Tune Could Lead to Better HealthAmericans Are Eating More Ultra-Processed FoodsFDA Reduces Recommended Salt Levels in Americans' FoodMen, Women Behaved Differently During Pandemic LockdownsIntense Workouts Right Before Bed Could Cost You SleepAHA News: How You Feel About Your Place on the Social Ladder Can Affect Your HealthHow to Sleep Better During the PandemicDealing With Grief in the Time of COVIDWould More Free Time Really Make You Happier?All Those Steps Every Day Could Lead to Longer LifeGot 'Zoom Fatigue'? Taking Breaks From the Camera Can HelpTrying Out a New Skin Care Product? Test It FirstDon't Forget to Apply Sunscreen Before & After Water FunFeel Guilty About 'Useless' Leisure Time? Your Mental Health Might SufferWant That Healthy Skin Glow? These Foods Can Get You ThereSit All Day for Work? Simple Step Can Cut Your Health RiskTry These 3 Tips to Lose Those Pandemic PoundsTake This Refresher on Skin Safety in Summer SunAll Sunglasses Not Equal When it Comes to Eye ProtectionThe Heat Is On: Staying Safe When Temperatures SoarDaylight Saving Time Change Toughest on Night OwlsMoney Can Buy Americans Longer Life: StudySleepless Nights Can Quickly Mess Up Your EmotionsSoaring Temperatures Bring Heat Stroke DangersShining a Light on SunscreensAnother Fireworks Hazard: Loss of HearingFireworks Deaths Spiked in Pandemic; Stay Safe This 4thAHA News: Embraceable, Healthy News: Hugging Is BackSurvey Finds Many Adults Don't Want Kids -- and They're HappyWhy Music at Bedtime Might Not Be a Great Idea'Plant-Based' or Low-Fat Diet: Which Is Better for Your Heart?Not Ready for Post-Pandemic Mingling? Expert Offers Tips to Ease AnxietyFewer Than 1 in 10 American Adults Get Enough Dietary FiberSummer Water Fun Can Bring Drowning Risks: Stay SafeAHA News: As the Mercury Rises, Follow These 5 Summer Survival TipsSleep Deprived? Coffee Can Only Help So MuchAmericans on the Move as Post-Pandemic Life BeginsSummer Safety Tips for the Great OutdoorsMany Americans Confused About Sunscreens: PollCity Parks: Safe Havens That Don't Raise COVID Infection RisksCan Some Movies Change Your Life? Maybe, Study FindsAlcohol Is No Friend to Social DistancingFeeling Down? Support Via Social Media May Not Be Enough'BPA-Free' Bottles Might Need a Run Through Your Dishwasher FirstAHA News: 5 Critical Steps to Help Prevent a StrokeWhat's the Right Amount of Sleep for a Healthy Heart?AHA News: Take Stock of Your Health With This Post-Lockdown ChecklistYou & Your Friends Are Vaccinated. So Why Is Socializing Again Scary?Even Before COVID, Many More People Died Early in U.S. Versus Europe
LinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Smoking
Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management
Weight Loss

Take This Refresher on Skin Safety in Summer Sun


HealthDay News
Updated: Aug 1st 2021

new article illustration

SUNDAY, Aug. 1, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Sun protection is essential as you enjoy the outdoors this summer, a skin expert stresses.

"Skin cancer is the most common cancer in humans so it's important that we do what we can to protect ourselves," Dr. Ida Orengo, a professor of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, said in a school news release.

Here are some of her tips:

  • Wear a sunscreen with SPF 30 or above and reapply every two hours when outdoors. Recent reports about the chemical benzene in sunscreens were limited to specific spray and gel sunscreens. But if you're concerned about ingredients in chemical sunscreens, use a physical blocking sunscreen made from zinc oxide or titanium dioxide. Other alternatives include using a daily moisturizer that contains SPF, or products like Klenskin body wash that contain sunscreen.
  • Avoid the sun during peak hours — 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. If you are outside during peak hours, use sunscreen, protective clothing and stay in the shade when possible. Protective clothing is made with tightly woven fabrics that block the sun or contain SPF. Another option is to wash your summer wardrobe in a detergent that adds UV protection into clothing, such as SunGuard. Also, keep a sun shirt or jacket in your car so that you'll have sun protection on hand if you suddenly decide to spend time outdoors.
  • Protect your head and feet. Wear a hat with a brim that is at least three inches wide to protect your head and neck, as well as sunglasses with UV protection. Don't forget to put sunscreen on your feet or to wear shoes that cover the tops of your feet.
  • Consider supplements. There's evidence that some vitamin supplements can protect you from the sun, said Orengo, recommending a vitamin B3 called nicotinamide. She advised taking 500 mg twice a day, but said to consult with your physician first. "In one study with nicotinamide, the researchers found that it had a 30% reduction in skin cancers," Orengo said.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on sun safety.

SOURCE: Baylor College of Medicine, news release, July 22, 2021